Your Essential Packing List For An Indo Surf Trip

20 May 2017 1 Share

COASTALWATCH

THESE ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT ITEMS TO PACK FOR AN INDO SURF TRIP

Tips by Matt Grainger 

So you’ve got your trip booked to Indo and you’re frothing to get out in the warm water, pumping long lines and sunshine. It’s easy to get over excited right now, but don’t let it take over. Here are the most important things you need to check off in preparation to take off. 

1 - BOARDS:

First and maybe most importantly, you need to do some research, talking and testing. Chat to your shaper about where you’re going because each spot in the archipelago has varying waves of all shapes, sizes and intensities. Your ability will also have to be taken into account. The suggestions below are for a moderately intermediate to experienced surfer.

Realistically (and if your budget permits) you’ll need at least three boards because you’re probably going to break one and you don’t want to be caught out on day two with nothing to ride.

If you’re going to G-Land and you’re around the 70-85kg mark you’ll be looking for boards around 6’6 to 7’0 range. If you’re headed to Bali and G-Land try to fit a bigger board for the bigger days, something around 8’0. If you’re off to the Mentawais your boards can be smaller because the waves are generally more ripable and smaller so you can pick something out of the 5’9 - 6’2 range at the most.

Once you’ve selected your quiver it’s crucial to test them out. Make sure you ride at home, even the bigger boards. Get them out in small surf to make sure you’re not taking a dog all that way.

2 - FINS:

You need to get the best fin setup you can. Fins can make or break your experience in the Indo waves. The best fins to pack for your boards are stiffer, larger sized fins. Indonesian waves are fast and the larger fins will give you that extra hold and control you’ll be looking for.

On bigger days you can ride shorter boards - than you would on a bigger day in Australia - with larger fins to push your board really hard. You don’t want too much flex in the fins either because you get so much speed down the line. You will really notice how much control you need especially on the takeoff and tube ridin. The Mick Fanning large thruster set by FCS is great.

3 - GEAR:

- Sunscreen and a good natural zinc, (like SurfMud) and lots of it.

- A cap and surf hat. It’s really important to protect your eyes and head from the harsh Indonesian sun.

- 2 pairs of sunnies

- A few pairs of boardies

- A Spring Suit. G-Land does get a bit colder with the cold current/upwelling

- Booties to protect your feet from the reef

- Tape for cuts and a good medical kit to plug up all your wounds

- Sex Wax Blue - Extra Hard Tropical

- A bunch of legropes including;
> a couple of 6ft comps and
> 6ft standards/premium
> 7ft standard for the bigger days
> If you check the forecast and it’s looking like 8ft+ make sure you pack in a 12ft for the bigger days at Uluwatu and on the outer reefs if you’re serious about going out in the big stuff.

- Spare tees and hats to give out to the locals. They always get so stoked, especially on the more isolated islands.

- Ding repair kit. (Pick one up from your local surf shop or shaper and check out how to do a quick repair right here.)

- Travel Insurance. Don’t overlook it, it could just save you tens of thousands of dollars and potentially your life.

4 - FITNESS:

Sometimes people overlook one important element, fitness. You will need to get conditioned for the long days you’ll be doing so you don’t fade out after your first day. It’s best to get started 6-8 weeks before your trip training 2-3 times per week.

Include a mix of extra paddling sessions, swimming in the pool, body weight exercises and stretching. Surf as much as you can! Do a lot of stretching through the hips to stay fluid. At home or in the gym chin ups and burpies are great.

If you’re going on a boat trip with a group of mates get them together to train in the lead up, it will make it easier and more fun to stay on track and be right on target for when you leave. You want to be ready for wipe outs and to surf for 6-8 hours a day.

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